Monday, July 22, 2019

Reasons Your Tree Changing Colors in Spring or Summer is a Bad Sign

Distressed tree changing colors and dying

Is your tree changing color when it should be green? Tree foliage will change color for several reasons. Some of those reasons may lead to the death of the tree, while others are merely seasonal.

toddsmariettatreeservices.com gathered information on why trees change color, and when a color change signals severe problems with trees.

Deciduous vs. Evergreen Trees

In a very general sense, trees may be classified in one of two categories; deciduous or evergreen. When their foliage changes color, it can be interpreted as:

Deciduous Trees – A deciduous tree keeps its green color throughout spring and summer. During autumn, its leaves will change from green to vibrant yellow, orange, red, or purple before falling to the ground.

This color change occurs as the days shorten and temperatures drop. As the leaves cease their food making process, the chlorophyll breaks down, the green color fades away, and so begins the fall color change and leaf drop spectacle.

Leaf color change on deciduous trees in fall

This process also enables the tree to conserve energy as it prepares to enter dormancy throughout late autumn and winter.

Evergreen Trees – As the name suggests, these trees remain green throughout the year. Typically, they will drop small amounts of foliage as new growth takes its place during the spring and summer months.

While healthy evergreen trees slow down considerably during autumn and winter months, they retain their foliage and green color.

Diseased, Infested, and Dying Trees

When a deciduous tree changes color during spring or summer months, or an evergreen changes color at any time, there is cause for concern. One or a combination of the following may be causing the tree to decline in health or die:

Drought – Drought conditions can happen any time throughout the year, and trees viscerally respond to hydraulic failure.

When there is a lack of water within a tree, the entire crown may be affected in the following ways:

• Chlorosis (loss of color) of the foliage
• Wilting
• Premature leaf drop
• Hardening of branches and twigs
• Self-pruning (shedding of entire branches)

If a regular water supply is not restored to the tree at the onset of drought symptoms, the tree will likely die.

Solution: Maintain a watering pattern throughout the year, increasing the frequency during dry stretches and decreasing during rainy seasons.

Root Rot – Excess water may deprive tree roots of getting the air that they need, leading to decay. To avoid root rot, it is best to only water trees when the soil becomes dry, and to plant the tree in well-drained soil.

Symptoms of root rot are very similar to those of drought, including chlorosis, and premature leaf drop, as both ailments cause hydraulic failure within the tree.

Tree leaf chlorosis and death from disease stress

One of the significant differences between drought and root rot is the destabilization of a tree affected by root rot. Without firm roots to anchor the tree, the lightest of storm activity may cause it to topple.

Solution: Avoid overwatering trees and plants located in poorly drained soil. If root rot has already occurred, contact a tree service professional to evaluate the situation and recommend a course of action.

Heart Rot – Trees are susceptible to heart-rotting fungi that produce a lightweight, soft, spongy, stringy, or powdery heart decay. Signs that a tree is rotting from the inside are:

• Leaf chlorosis
• Wilting
• Premature leaf drop
• Dead and brittle branches
• Mushroom conks growing from the trunk
• Bark abnormalities (swelling, deep cracks, or holes)

While trees are very good at compartmentalizing (isolating) damaged or diseased portions of themselves, some fungi can cause massive amounts of potentially fatal damage before the tree can react.

Solution: The following will help a tree avoid heart rot:

• Promote the tree’s health (watering, pruning, fertilizing, mulching)
• Prune in late fall or early winter
• Avoid bark damage
• Remove storm-damaged branches

Trees with symptoms of heart rot should be evaluated and treated or removed by a tree service professional, as soon as possible to avoid severe damages should the tree topple or collapse.

If your tree is dying, learn more about what you can do at toddsmariettatreeservices.com/my-tree-is-dying-what-do-i-do/

Anthracnose – Anthracnose can attack a tree (fruit trees are more susceptible) at any stage of its growth and can affect leaves, stems, pods, fruits, and roots. The symptoms of anthracnose are:

• Small irregular yellow, brown, or black spots that expand and merge together on foliage. Severe infections can affect entire portions of the crown.
• Cankers on stems and branches that cause extreme defoliation and rotting of fruit and roots.
• Fruits develop sunken circular spots that darken with age, eventually producing gelatinous pink spore masses.

Signs and symptoms of anthracnose tree disease

Solution: The following can help prevent an anthracnose infection:

• Promote your tree’s health (watering, pruning, fertilizing, mulching)
• Transplant only healthy seedlings
• Remove and destroy infected tree parts
• Harvest unripe but mature fruits
• Plants species that are resistant to anthracnose disease
• Keep the landscape free of weeds

If your tree has become severely infected with anthracnose, the best containment of the disease may be the complete removal and destruction of the tree. Hire a tree service professional to evaluate the tree’s situation, and risk to surrounding vegetation before deciding on a course of action.

You can learn more about tree diseases and treatment at toddsmariettatreeservices.com/5-marietta-ga-tree-diseases-identification-treatment/

Insect Infestation – Severe infestations by honeydew-producing aphids, leaf-consuming caterpillars, trunk burrowing beetles, and other opportunistic insects can lead to a tree being overstressed and dying. Symptoms of an insect infestation may include:

• Chlorosis of the foliage of a portion of or the entire crown
• Wilting and leaf drop
• Damaged or eaten foliage
• The appearance of sooty mold on infested foliage
• The presence of ants (colonizing and tending to aphids)
• Severe premature leaf drop
• Burrowed circular holes in branch or trunk bark

Tree leaf damage from insect infestation

Solution: Upon detection of an insect infestation, the infected and surrounding trees should be treated and protected with:

• Insect traps (tree bands, ant traps, beetle traps, etc.)
• Neem oil spray
• Insecticide

In cases where beetles and other burrowing insects are involved, a tree service professional should be contracted to survey the tree, property, and surrounding landscape to attempt to gain full control over the infestation.

Climbing Vines – If left uncontrolled, climbing vines are capable of ascending to the top of a tree and spreading across its crown. As the vine spreads its foliage, it absorbs the sunlight otherwise intended for the tree, leading to the following:

• Leaf chlorosis
• Wilting
• Premature leaf drop
• Nutrient deficiency (weakened health)

Climbing vines can girdle and kill trees

When vines take over the canopy of a tree, you may see green, healthy foliage (from the vine) mixed with wilting or dying foliage (from the tree). As the tree weakens, it will become susceptible to insect infestation and disease, compounding its health decline and hastening its death.

Solution: Sever the vine from its root system near the ground and let it die off. However, don’t try to remove the vine from the tree. As the vine was climbing, it anchored to the tree’s bark, any attempt to pull the vine down may severely damage the bark, resulting in the girdling of the tree.

To learn more on how to save your tree from clinging vines, read toddsmariettatreeservices.com/saving-trees-clinging-vines/

Trees Changing Colors

Is your tree turning yellow or brown when it’s supposed to be green? There are several reasons that trees will change color, and many of those reasons may indicate serious problems that can kill the tree.

In this article, you discovered why trees change color in the fall, and problems that may lead them to change color and suffer leaf drop in the spring or summer months.

While it is normal for deciduous trees to change color in the fall, ignoring an off-season color change or leaf drop can lead to the death of your tree.

Sources:
https://www.esf.edu/pubprog/brochure/leaves/leaves.htm
https://hort.extension.wisc.edu/articles/chlorosis/
http://www.oisat.org/pests/diseases/fungal/anthracnose.html
https://www.canr.msu.edu/news/be_careful_where_you_spray_that_stuff

Todd’s Marietta Tree Services

200 Cobb Pkwy N Ste 428 Marietta, GA 30062
(678) 505-0266

Originally published on: http://www.toddsmariettatreeservices.com/reasons-tree-changing-colors-spring-summer-bad-sign/

Thursday, June 20, 2019

Killing Carpenter Ants in Your Tree and What They Mean

Black carpenter ant represents decay when nesting in trees

Do you see big black ants crawling all over your tree? While carpenter ants need to be controlled, they are the least of your worries and indicators of potentially bigger problems.

Carpenter ants nesting in a tree are a sign of a more pressing problem that, if not addressed, will kill your tree, leaving the ants to move on to a new home.

toddsmariettatreeservices.com gathered information on how to eliminate carpenter ants from your tree and what an infestation means.

How to Get Rid of Carpenter Ants in a Tree

When carpenter ants invade a tree, there is a risk that they will also invade nearby structures. Within a typical carpenter ant colony, foragers continuously seek new sources of nutrition or a suitably sheltered location to either move the colony to or form satellite colonies.

The best time for controlling carpenter ants is when activity is at its height during the spring and summer months. During the winter, they will hibernate unless located near a constant source of heat.

When attempting to eliminate a carpenter ant infestation, you are searching for the following:

Parent Colony – The parent colony contains an egg-laying queen, workers, and numerous broods. These colonies can be found in:

• Rotting tree stumps
• Injured or dying trees
• Within the walls or wooden features of a structure frequently exposed to moisture

Carpenter ant colony nesting in decaying tree

As ants are capable of foraging and traveling great distances from a parent colony, your search for either a parent or satellite colony should be as broad as possible.

Satellite Colonies – A satellite colony may contain pupae, mature larvae, and workers.

Common places to find satellite colonies are:

• Within the rotted wood of old window frames.
• Shingles or wood siding exposed to constant moisture.
• Nearby trees with declining health or previous stressors.

Controlling an infestation of ants inside a tree is a difficult task which must be done to prevent the creation of satellite colonies and the invasion of surrounding structures.

Dust insecticides that contain pyrethroids or carbaryl designated for use on landscape trees are suggested for control:

• Apply the dust directly into and around the nest cavity.
• Watch for foraging ants and dust along the path they travel.
• Annual retreatment may be necessary, as carpenter ants are difficult to control in trees.

Liquid insecticides that contain a sugar based bait and borax as the killing agent are among the most effective long-term solutions available. For DIY or homemade insecticidal soap recipes, see toddsmariettatreeservices.com/insecticidal-soap-recipe-control-tree-pests/ then below outlines how to apply the solution:

Liquid insecticide for carpenter ant control in a diseased tree

• Spray the insecticide in and around the nest cavity.
• Follow the ants along their trail to find other holes, or entryways to satellite colonies and spray them.
• This is a slow acting insecticide which allows the ants to carry the poison back to the nest and feed it to others.

In either case, never disturb the nest before applying the dust or liquid insecticides. When ants get “spooked” or sense danger, they erratically and quickly leave their nest, will avoid consuming the poison, and may prompt some to stray off and begin another colony.

This picture shows a nest cavity before applying an insecticide.

Diseased and decaying tree with carpenter ant colony infestation

This picture shows the same nest cavity immediately after applying an insecticide.

Carpenter ant colony leaving insecticide treated tree

NOTE: Ants leave a pheromone trail behind them for others to follow and for them to return to their colony. By dusting or spraying along their path, you are increasing your chances for successful control.

What a Carpenter Ant Infestation Means

Carpenter ants are opportunistic in nature. They differ from termites in that they do not eat wood or pulp, rather they burrow through it. To accomplish this in trees, they take advantage of a preexisting condition that has weakened, killed, or caused decay within the tree.

Environmental issues, previous infestations, poor pruning habits, and disease can all contribute to the declining health of a tree, and the successful infestation of it by carpenter ants. Knots, old insect tunnels, holes, cracks, and poorly healed pruning cuts can all offer access to carpenter ants. For more info on common tree diseases, see toddsmariettatreeservices.com/5-marietta-ga-tree-diseases-identification-treatment/

As a growing carpenter ant colony burrows into the heartwood of a tree, you are likely to notice the partial or complete dieback of branches and limbs.

Carpenter ant infested tree with branch dieback

Once a carpenter ant infestation is confirmed, have your tree inspected for signs of disease, other insect infestations, fungal infection, and rot. Again, carpenter ants are the least of your concerns. If they are present and thriving, it is due to other issues that have debilitated your tree’s defenses.

Avoid dressing or sealing wounds and cavities. This will not eliminate or prevent carpenter ant activity or the decay that made their presence possible.

The removal of your tree, based on an ant infestation, should only occur if absolutely required for the safety of your property.

Carpenter Ants and Tree Health

Black ants crawling all over your tree are signs of decay within the tree and represent an urgent need to identify the preexisting condition that gave them access in the first place.

Carpenter ants on a diseased tree

In this article, you discovered methods to control and eliminate carpenter ants from your tree, and what their presence means for its health.

Your delay in controlling a carpenter ant infestation allows the colony to burrow deeper into your tree while establishing satellite colonies in other trees and structures around the parent colony. The longer you wait, the larger, more invasive, and more damaging this species of ants will become.

Sources:
https://ento.psu.edu/extension/factsheets/carpenter-ants
https://extension.umn.edu/insects-infest-homes/carpenter-ants
http://ipm.ucanr.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7416.html

Todd’s Marietta Tree Services

200 Cobb Pkwy N Ste 428 Marietta, GA 30062
(678) 505-0266

Originally published on: http://www.toddsmariettatreeservices.com/killing-carpenter-ants-what-they-mean/

Thursday, May 23, 2019

How to Grow an Apple Tree in Marietta Georgia

Apple tree planting and harvest in Marietta Ga

So you want free apples for life? It’s as simple as planting a tree, but there are some things you must know before trying to grow an apple tree in your backyard.

Growing apple trees may seem easy, and it is when you know how to acclimate them and care for them as they mature. By using simple care techniques, you’ll be harvesting homegrown apples before you know it.

toddsmariettatreeservices.com gathered information on how to acclimate, plant, and care for apple trees until they begin to bear fruit.

Apple Trees from Seeds, Seedlings, or Saplings

If you want to grow and harvest your favorite apples, your first decisions are which species of apple and in what phase of growth to start. The following will help you decide:

Starting from Seeds – If you can create and maintain a controlled environment for seeds to sprout and flourish in, it is the longest but most engaging way to grow your apple trees.

Planting fertile apple tree seeds

Eating an apple and retrieving the seeds from the core may seem like a logical way to get started, but store-bought hybrid apples typically do not have viable seeds or seeds that will grow true to the species. Your best bet is to visit your local nursery or the plant and garden section of your local home improvement store for viable, fertile seeds.

Starting from Seedlings – Seedlings are a great way to start growing a tree. However, they are still fragile and require a controlled environment for the first few months of growth. Seedlings should be allowed to acclimate to their new environment for 5 to 10 days before being transplanted to a larger container.

Apple tree seedling growing in container

Once seedlings “get a feel” for their new location, they tend to grow fairly rapidly. However, seedlings will require several transplants before finally moving them outside for acclimation and to their permanent location.

Starting from Saplings – This is perhaps the easiest way to grow your apple tree. Besides circumventing all of the care and precaution needed for seeds and saplings, saplings are almost ready to be planted in their permanent location.

Saplings should be acclimated to the outside environment by leaving them in partial shade for 3 to 4 hours daily, for 7 to 10 days. Once a sapling has been acclimated, it can be transplanted to its permanent outside location.

Planted apple tree sapling in Marietta Ga

Apple Tree Needs

Before planting your apple tree in its permanent location in late winter or early spring, read toddsmariettatreeservices.com/expert-shares-5-important-tree-planting-tips/, then consider these specific apple tree requirements:

Sun Requirements – For best growth and fruiting, your apple tree should get full sunlight (this is 6 or more hours of direct summertime sunlight daily).

Spacing Requirements – Regular apple trees require 25 to 30 feet between trees; semi-dwarf apple trees need 15 to 20 feet, and the dwarf species can be spaced 10 to 15 feet apart.

Regular sized mature apple tree spacing 30 feet between trees

Soil Requirements – Apple trees can thrive in soils ranging from medium textured clays to gravelly sands. However, the healthiest trees and best crops are found on well-drained fertile sandy soils and loams.

Apples do best in neutral to slightly acidic soil with a pH between 7.0 and 5.8. You can amend the pH level in acidic soil by incorporating lime before transplanting.

Crown rot (Phytophthora cactorum) is a common issue in poorly drained soil. Apple tree rooting is typically shallow, and wet soils tend to restrict root development. This subsequently results in poor anchorage and reduced extraction of nutrients for tree development.

Watering Requirements – Although apples contain high water content, apple trees do not need daily heavy watering. However, you should adjust your watering schedule to avoid dry soil and drought stress to your trees.

Water your trees in the early morning, or if your schedule doesn’t permit it, early evening watering will help your apple trees thrive.

Your watering schedule should increase in frequency as your apple trees begin to bear fruit, and return to normal after the harvesting period.

Pruning Requirements – Prune your apple trees in late winter, while the trees are in a state of dormancy. Remove any downward growing branches and dead or diseased branches; also remove any suckers growing from the base of the tree or within the root spread.

Suckers growing from tree trunk and roots

As pruning stimulates new growth, only emergency pruning (diseased branches, weather damage, etc.) should take place in late summer or fall. Any growth late in the season will not have time to harden in preparation for winter months dormancy and will die.

Pollination Requirements – On average, newly planted apple trees require 2 to 5 years to establish, mature, and bloom. Some species take 5 to 10 years to bloom and bear fruit. Like all fruit trees, pollination is required for apple trees to bear fruit.

Unless the species is self-fertile (Anna, Golden Dorsett, Gordon, etc.), cross-pollination is required. However, self-fertile species bear more heavy crops when cross-pollinated.

Proper pollination occurs when trees of different varieties bloom at the same time. Trees of the same variety won’t get the job done.

If you only have room for one apple tree and natural cross-pollination isn’t possible, you can purchase apple pollen from a local nursery and pollinate the tree by hand (be sure that the species are compatible for best results).

Watch this video to learn more about apple tree pollination.

Growing Apple Trees

With all the free apples after your first harvest, will you make apple pies, apple fritters, or apple sauce? By following these simple planting and care techniques, your apple trees will thrive and provide free apples for years to come.

In this article, you discovered how to acclimate your saplings, planting requirements, and care tips to give your apple trees their best chance to mature, thrive, and bear fruit.

It’s not enough to just plant an apple tree and hope it does well. For your apple tree to thrive, you must be knowledgable and pay attention to a host of easy to learn factors.

Sources:
https://www.yara.us/crop-nutrition/apple/agronomic-principles/
http://extension.uga.edu/publications/detail.html?number=C740&title=Home%20Garden%20Apples
https://www.allotment-garden.org/fruit/apples-growing/

Todd’s Marietta Tree Services

200 Cobb Pkwy N Ste 428 Marietta, GA 30062
(678) 505-0266

Originally published on: http://www.toddsmariettatreeservices.com/how-to-grow-apple-tree-marietta-georgia/

Monday, April 29, 2019

5 Best Low-Maintenance Trees for Your Marietta Yard

low maintenance evergreen trees for your Marietta Ga yard

What if you could plant trees that take care of themselves, need little to no maintenance, and stay beautiful all year long?

Large deciduous trees can drop an overwhelming amount of leaves and leave you with hundreds of twigs, limbs, and branches to prune. By planting smaller evergreen trees, you’ll save time and energy that you can spend on other activities.

toddsmariettatreeservices.com gathered 5 of the best low-maintenance evergreen tree species to plant in your Marietta yard.

Marietta Georgia and the USDA Hardiness Zone Map

The city of Marietta, Ga is situated in zone 7b on the USDA Hardiness Zone Map. The city boasts a wide variety of deciduous and evergreen tree species comprising its incredibly robust canopy.

The following species were selected based on their ease of care, hardiness to zone 7b, and their flexibility of use in landscaping.

American Arborvitae (Thuja occidentalis)

This tall, pyramid-shaped elegant species is a common choice for windbreaks, accents for entryways, hedges, or single specimens. The American arborvitae requiring almost no care can reach heights of 20 to 30 feet with a spread of 10 to 15 feet.

American arborvitae low maintenance tree for your Marietta Ga yard

Thriving in USDA Hardiness Zones 3 through 7, this species grows at a rate of 12 to 24 inches per year and adapts well to most well-drained soil types including loamy, sandy, and clay.

Leyland Cypress (Cupressus × leylandii)

This hybrid of Monterey cypress (Cupressus macrocarpa) and Alaskan cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis) is a valued landscape tree as well as being one of the most sought after Christmas trees in the southeastern states. The Leyland cypress is a fast-growing pyramid shaped species that can reach heights of more than 60 feet with a spread of 15 to 25 feet.

Leyland cypress low maintenance tree for your Marietta Ga yard

Thriving in USDA Hardiness Zones 6 through 10, this species can grow more than 24 inches per year until reaching maturity and adapts perfectly to well-drained, moist, rich, alkaline, acidic, loamy, sandy, and clay soils.

Fully mature Leyland cypress trees typically grow a shallow root system and when planted in unsheltered conditions may topple in severe weather conditions.

Green Velvet Boxwood (Buxus ‘Green Velvet’)

This broadleaf evergreen hybrid has the hardiness of Korean boxwood with the English boxwood’s deep green foliage. Commonly used as a low hedge, border, specimen, or accent, the green velvet boxwood is a slow growing, oval or round-shaped species that reaches 4 feet in height and width at maturity. This species is common in topiaries as it can be easily sheared into any form.

Green velvet boxwood low maintenance tree for your Marietta Ga yard

Well-adapted to USDA Hardiness Zones 4 through 9, this species grows at a rate of under 12 inches per year and can thrive in a wide range of soil types but is intolerant of wet soil conditions.

The green velvet boxwood requires a location with full sun or partial shade and protection from strong wind, heavy snowfall, and winter sun.

Weeping Willow (Salix babylonica)

With ground-sweeping branches, this graceful species grows exceptionally well on landscapes with water features. The weeping willow is a fast-growing low-maintenance species requiring occasional pruning and reaching upwards of 40 feet in height and a 35-foot spread.

Weeping willow low maintenance tree for your Marietta Ga yard

This iconic species thrives in USDA Hardiness Zones 6 through 8, the weeping willow is capable of growing at an annual rate of 2 feet and adapts to well-drained, moist, rich, alkaline, acidic, loamy, sandy, and clay soils.

While this species grows extremely well near water, it is drought tolerant and can be planted in most mid-sized and large landscapes.

Norway Spruce (Picea abies)

An ideal windbreaker, the Norway spruce is the fastest growing of the spruces. This species requires little to no maintenance and is capable of reaching heights of over 60 feet with a 25-foot spread at maturity.

Norway spruce low maintenance tree for your Marietta Ga yard

The Norway spruce thrives in USDA Hardiness Zones 3 through 7 and can grow at an incredible rate of up to 2 feet per year. This species prefers full sun and is well-adapted to acidic, loamy, sandy, well-drained, and clay soils. With some drought tolerance, the Norway spruce can survive extended dry seasons with little to no harm.

While the Norway spruce grows in a compact pyramidal shape, it can take on an unkempt appearance as it ages.

Low-Maintenance Evergreen Trees

Spend less time maintaining your yard and more time enjoying its beauty by planting low-maintenance trees.

In this article, you discovered the growing traits and characteristics for the American arborvitae, Leyland cypress, green velvet boxwood, weeping willow, and Norway spruce species.

If you want to spend less time raking leaves, pruning trees, and managing soil pH levels, plant trees that take care of themselves and require minimal care.

Sources:
https://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/PHZMWeb/
https://www.arborday.org
http://extension.uga.edu

Todd’s Marietta Tree Services

200 Cobb Pkwy N Ste 428 Marietta, GA 30062
(678) 505-0266

Originally published on: http://www.toddsmariettatreeservices.com/5-best-low-maintenance-trees-marietta-yard/

Monday, March 25, 2019

My Tree is Dying – What Do I Do?

Tree death from disease and infestation

Don’t let your dying tree fall on your house. All trees grow, age, and will eventually die, knowing the signs of a troubled tree and how to respond will keep your property and loved ones safe.

Illness and disease can slowly eat away at the health of your trees, and when this happens, knowing what to do becomes critical. In some cases, the signs are so subtle that trouble is overlooked, and the tree subsequently falls on your car or house.

toddsmariettatreeservices.com explains how to identify a tree emergency, the signs of a troubled tree, and what to do when your tree starts dying.

Dying Tree Emergency

There are tree emergencies that are obvious and require immediate attention. The following situations will generally end up requiring an emergency tree removal:

Leaning Tree – When a tree can no longer secure itself to the land it is growing in or has broken away from the roots holding it down, it may lean before falling. This is a tree emergency and may require its immediate removal by a professional tree service.

Leaning tree indicates potential health emergency

Mushrooms Growing on the Tree – One of the most alarming signs that a tree is dying is the growth of mushrooms on the trunk.

Mushrooms require decaying organic material to flourish. If they are growing on your tree, it means that the inside of the tree is decaying and is an immediate hazard to its surroundings.

Dying tree with mushrooms on the trunk and roots

As with the situation of a leaning tree, this is an emergency requiring immediate professional action.

Insect Infestation – Boring insects can wreak havoc on the inside of a tree. If severe enough, an infestation can kill stressed or healthy trees, and continue to spread from tree to tree.

If you have detected the presence of boring insects, it is imperative that a professional tree service is called to evaluate the extent of the infestation, the amount of damage your tree has sustained, and a plan to halt the spread of the infestation to neighboring trees.

Termite and boring insect infestation kills trees

To learn more about the signs and symptoms of a troubled tree, read toddsmariettatreeservices.com/troubled-tree-signs-symptoms/

My Tree is Dying – I Think

As trees grow, they go through many phases which may appear as if they are dying. That’s not always the case. Take the following into consideration:

Deciduous Trees – At the beginning of fall, you may notice your tree’s green leaves turning shades of red, orange, and yellow. Within a couple of weeks, all of the leaves fall to the ground leaving the trunk, branches, and twigs bare.

Healthy deciduous tree with fall colored foliage

In this scenario, your tree is likely doing what it needs to do in preparation for dormancy. Dormancy may cause your tree to appear dead, but in reality, this process is its protection against freezing temperatures and severe winter weather.

If however your tree loses its foliage before the fall season, or shows no sign of life into late spring, have the tree evaluated by a professional to determine a course of action.

Falling Branches – Without warning, an entire branch comes crashing to the ground. While this may be an alarming event, there are tree species such as the eucalyptus, Carolina poplar, American elm, aspen, or pecan tree that will drop a branch unannounced.

Dying tree self pruning by dropping entire branches

These trees are considered self-pruning. They are shade intolerant, and when the leaves of a branch don’t get enough sunlight to provide sufficient photosynthesis, the tree may simply dispatch the entire branch. Read northernwoodlands.org/articles/article/woods-whys-self-pruning-branches for more on self-pruning branches.

Before using the branch for firewood or disposing of it, inspect it for signs of infection or infestation. When a tree species that is not self-pruning drops a branch, it is an indication that something serious may be occurring within the tree.

In the absence of disease or infestation, professional crown thinning and seasonal pruning will help your tree avoid self-pruning.

Discover the right time for cutting, pruning, and emergency tree removal at toddsmariettatreeservices.com/right-time-cutting-pruning-emergency-tree-removal/

How to Handle a Dying Tree

While trees add value to their surroundings, benefit the environment, and are naturally beautiful, they can become a deadly liability as they age, become ill, and eventually die. Knowing how to identify and handle the signs of a dead or dying may save your property and the well-being of your loved ones.

In this article, you discovered what a tree emergency looks like, the signs of a troubled tree, and what to do if your tree is dying or dead.

Once you have detected a tree problem, you must take action to treat or remove that tree before it falls and causes catastrophic property damage or physical injury.

Sources:
https://www.jstor.org/stable/40595781?seq=1#metadata_info_tab_contents
http://extension.uga.edu/publications/detail.html?number=C1100&title=Is%20My%20Tree%20Dying?
https://extension.umd.edu/hgic/topics/how-do-you-decide-when-remove-tree

https://plus.google.com/+Toddsmariettatreeservices

Todd’s Marietta Tree Services

200 Cobb Pkwy N Ste 428 Marietta, GA 30062
(678) 505-0266

Originally published on: http://www.toddsmariettatreeservices.com/my-tree-is-dying-what-do-i-do/

Monday, February 25, 2019

Hickory Tree Facts, Diseases, and Care

Hickory tree in the fall with yellow foliage

Is the lack of information impacting your ability to care for and fight disease on the otherwise resilient hickory tree?

Hickory trees are among the most durable trees native to the United States. Any of the hickory tree species should be considered for your mid-sized or large landscape for their beauty and ease of care.

toddsmariettatreeservices.com gathered hickory tree facts, diseases, care tips, and answers some frequently asked questions.

Hickory Tree Facts

Hickory trees are a member of the Carya genus. There are about twenty species of hickory that comprise the genus, of which, 12 species are native to the United States.

Trees in the Carya genus are blooming and bearing tree species. Hickory trees are tough and durable, among the most long-lived, and are a frequent favorite in Southern landscaping.

Tree Name

Hickory

Scientific Name/Species

Carya tomentosa (most abundant of the hickories)

Family

Juglandaceae (walnut family)

Genus

Carya

Nickname/Other Tree(s)

Bitternut hickory (Carya cordiformis), pignut or black hickory (Carya glabra), sand hickory (Carya palida), red hickory (Carya ovalis), and mockernut hickory (Carya tomentosa) are all species within the Carya genus

State Tree

Texas (pecan – Carya illinoinensis)

 

Lifespan

Can live up to 500 years or more when planted in optimal conditions

Type

Deciduous

Hardiness Zone(s)

from 4 to 8

Soil Requirements

Tolerates most soil types but in all cases, prefers well-drained soil with full sun exposure

Planting Spacing

20ft between trees

Watering Requirements

Regular (to keep the soil moist) when young or planted. Minimal (during dry spells) thereafter

 

Height

60 to 100ft

DBH

1 to 2ft at maturity

Crown Span

40ft or more at maturity (the shape may vary depending on the species)

Root Spread

Hickory trees are known for their deep, expansive, and robust root systems which help them from being uprooted during the strongest of winds and storms

Fruit Production

Hickories require a 10-15 year period of growth before they will bear fruit

Uses in Landscaping

Hickories make a magnificent specimen, screen, or large shade tree, and are well suited for more spacious landscapes

Winter/Fall Colors

Golden yellow before leaf-drop in the fall

Hickory Tree Diseases

Hickory trees are extremely tough and resilient to disease when they are healthy, and the following are some of the diseases to watch for:

Hickory Anthracnose/Leaf Spot – The symptoms include large reddish spots on leaf tops and brown spots underneath. When an infection is severe, early defoliation may occur.

Many of the fungi that cause this disease will survive the winter on fallen infected leaves. When these leaves fall, they should be carefully disposed of.

Hickory tree fallen autumn foliage

For more info on the anthracnose disease, visit toddsmariettatreeservices.com/how-to-identify-treat-prevent-anthracnose/

Verticillium Wilt – Symptoms of this infection include entire branches or a whole section of a tree dying off. The foliage on affected parts of the tree will wilt and turn brown.

Help your tree remain healthy by pruning out infected branches, watering during dry weather, and seasonal fertilization.

Powdery Mildew – This disease causes a white “powdery” growth on the leaves. When this disease occurs early in the growing season, it can be treated using the following:

• In one gallon of water, mix one tablespoon of baking soda with a one-half teaspoon of liquid soap (non-detergent).
• Spray liberally on affected foliage.

If this infection occurs late in the season, control will not be required. Make sure that fallen leaves are collected and disposed of.

Witches Broom – This disease will typically follow a leaf spot disease. Symptoms include yellow spots on leaf surfaces with white spots on the underneath side.

Defoliation may occur from severe infections, and when the disease successfully enters the stem, a witches broom will form.

Leaves on the witches broom stems will be small, yellowish, and fall prematurely. When witches brooms form, prune them away, and call a tree service to evaluate the overall health of the tree.

Cankers – Cankers occur when a tree’s bark is wounded, and an opportunistic fungus finds its way into the wound. As the fungus grows and multiplies, it stops the tree from compartmentalizing the wound and can eventually spread throughout the tree.

Cankers that appear on twigs and branches should be pruned out, cutting all the way back to the trunk when the infection is severe. Cankers that form on the trunk of a tree should be inspected by a tree service to determine the best course of action.

To prevent cankers from forming, keep your trees healthy by watering them when the weather is dry, seasonally fertilizing them, and pruning them during their dormancy.

To be best prepared for preventing potential danger, read signs and symptoms of a troubled tree.

Hickory Tree Care

Caring for trees of the hickory species is easy and includes:

• Watering when the weather is dry.
• Pruning during the dormant season.
• Annual fertilizing.
• Treating fungi when affected.
• Scheduling an annual inspection.

Hickory tree watering and care

For more valuable information on tree watering and soil needs, visit toddsmariettatreeservices.com/tree-watering-rich-soil-healthy-trees/

Frequently Asked Questions

Question: Do all hickory trees produce nuts?
Answer: Yes. Hickory trees comprise the genus Carya (Ancient Greek for “nut”).

Question: Are hickory nuts edible for humans?
Answer: Yes. However, the flavor will vary from species to species.

Question: Are Hickory trees related to pecan trees?
Answer: Yes. In fact, the two are so closely related, they grow within the same hardiness zone and require the same care.

Hickory and pecan trees grow in the same hardiness zone and require equal care

Question: How long do hickory trees live?
Answer: Hickory trees are known to live beyond 500 years.

Question: What is hickory wood good for?
Answer: Being one of the strongest and hardest woods native to the United States, hickory is frequently used where shock-resistance and strength are required, such as wood flooring.

Hickory is also popular for smoking cured meats and cooking barbecue.

The Hickory Tree is a Perfect Landscape Specimen

Hickory trees from the Carya genus are easy to care for, and many of the species are native to the United States. These easy trees are among landscapers favorites for their resilience and ease of care.

In this article, you discovered hickory tree facts, diseases, care tips, and uncovered answers to frequently asked questions.

If the hickory tree isn’t a part of your landscape, you are missing out on a slow growing, beautifully shaped shade or screen tree. They are easy to plant and require minimal care efforts.

Sources:
http://hort.ufl.edu/database/documents/pdf/tree_fact_sheets/carovaa.pdf
http://www.bio.brandeis.edu/fieldbio/Survival/Pages/hickory.html
http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2013/10/25/the-hickory-tough-and-durable-landscape-trees/
https://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheet/pecan-planting-fertilization/

https://plus.google.com/+Toddsmariettatreeservices

Todd’s Marietta Tree Services

200 Cobb Pkwy N Ste 428 Marietta, GA 30062
(678) 505-0266

Originally published on: http://www.toddsmariettatreeservices.com/hickory-tree-facts-diseases-care/

Thursday, January 24, 2019

Proper Mulching Techniques Around Trees

Tree mulch organic material wood chips

Too much or not enough of this can kill your tree. The fallen leaves and needles we rake or blow away from trees are their way of naturally protecting their roots, thus, we mulch.

Tree roots depend on moist nutrient-rich soil year-round for continued growth and increased health. Every fall, your trees should be mulched appropriately to ensure their winter survival and spring prosperity.

toddsmariettatreeservices.com presents the definition, importance, and proper application of mulch for increased tree health and longevity, as well as providing answers to frequently asked questions.

What Is Mulching?

Mulching is the process of applying a layer of protective soil covering around trees, shrubs, and plants. Mulch is typically composed of organic material such as bark chips, straw, or pine needles.

The Importance of Mulching

Just as fallen leaves and needles do in the forest, mulch on urban landscapes:

• conserves soil moisture.
• prevents soil compaction.
• stops weed growth.
• insulates the soil from hot and freezing temperatures.
• improves soil fertility and health as it decomposes.
• helps prevent soil erosion.
• enhances the visual appeal of the landscape.
• prevents lawnmower damage to the root flare and trunk.

Of all the above benefits, perhaps the most significant is that mulch helps regulate soil temperature and moisture during extended periods of extreme heat or cold.

Nutrient rich and moist mulched soil

How To Mulch Around Trees

The following mulching instructions can be applied to trees of all ages and sizes.

Once you have determined the ideal type of mulch for your trees, proceed to:

  1. Create a “no mulch zone” extending 8 to 12 inches from the root flare all the way around the tree.
  2. Remove or cut grass as low as possible from the “no mulch zone” to the dripline. (the dripline is a circle around a tree at which the canopy ends)
  3. Collect a soil sample and test it for its pH level and nutrient content.
  4. Provide a deep watering to the area that will be mulched.
  5. Apply a 3 to 4-inch layer (up to 6 inches for areas with extended freezing temperatures) of mulch from the “no mulch zone” to the tree’s dripline.
  6. Ensure that the mulch is not in contact with the tree’s trunk or root flare.
  7. Adjust the pH level or enrich the soil by applying granular fertilizer to the mulch. No need to mix it in, regular watering and rain will carry it to the soil.

The ideal time to mulch a tree is immediately after planting it. Established trees can be mulched in the fall.

New tree planting and mulching

Each fall thereafter, fluff the mulch and add more when necessary.

Note: Compacted mulch will lose its ability to regulate soil moisture and temperature. When this occurs, use a rake to fluff the mulch or replace it.

People Also Ask

Question: Can mulch kill a tree?
Answer: Yes. If the mulch is resting against the tree trunk or root flare, it can cause this area to decay, leading to the destabilization and death of the tree.

Question: Do you have to remove old mulch before applying new mulch?
Answer: Yes. If the mulch is riddled with fungi, bacteria, or you have detected an easily transmitted disease such as anthracnose, this mulch should be disposed of with care.

Answer: No. If there are no signs of disease and the intention is to refresh or fluff the mulch.

Question: Do I need to mulch every year?
Answer: If you are using mulch composed of bark, wood chips, or other organic material, annually revitalizing or refreshing the mulch is a good standard.

Question: What is the best mulch to keep bugs away?
Answer: Cedar and cypress mulch are effective at repelling, killing, or inhibiting most insects and some ant species.

Question: Is mulching only for deciduous trees?
Answer: No. Both evergreen and deciduous trees can be mulched. This is especially true in climates that experience extreme heat in the summer or long periods of freezing temperatures in the winter.

Mulch for deciduous and evergreen trees in winter

Question: Can you put too much mulch around a tree?
Answer: Yes. While one of the purposes of mulch is to help the soil retain moisture, too much mulch can retain too much moisture causing the roots to rot, subsequently causing hydraulic failure and death of the tree.

Conversely, not enough mulch can allow too much moisture to escape. This may result in “drought-like” conditions or the freezing of the roots depending on the season.

Mulching for Better Tree Health

Trees naturally mulch themselves to protect their roots when leaves or needles fall to the ground. In a landscape or urban setting, those leaves and needles get removed. You could say that mulching is our way of returning that root protection to the trees.

In this article, you discovered the definition, importance, and proper application of mulch. You also uncovered frequently asked mulching questions and their answers.

By properly mulching your trees, you are promoting their continued growth and health. Trees that are improperly mulched, or not mulched at all run the risk of declining health, successful attacks from insects and disease, and eventual death.

Sources:
https://hort.ifas.ufl.edu/woody/over-mulching.shtml
https://www.johnson.k-state.edu/lawn-garden/agent-articles/trees-shrubs/how-to-mulch-trees.html
https://forestry.usu.edu/trees-cities-towns/tree-care/mulching-tree-health

https://plus.google.com/+Toddsmariettatreeservices

Todd’s Marietta Tree Services

200 Cobb Pkwy N Ste 428 Marietta, GA 30062
(678) 505-0266

Originally published on: http://www.toddsmariettatreeservices.com/proper-mulching-techniques-around-trees/